Saturday, May 23, 2009

THE HISTORY OF BAIL

THE HISTORY OF BAIL SUMMERIZED
Modern bail as we Americans know it came from Medieval England, after the colonist declared independence they formulated their own policies which were very similar to what they had in England. Now as Americans the Eight Amendment of the Constitution of the United States is what guarantees us the right to bail. The Eight Amendment summed up is the following:
1. The Cruel and Unusual Punishment Clause which restricts the severity of punishments that state and federal governments may impose upon persons who have been convicted of a criminal offense.
2. The Excessive Fines Clause limits the amount that state and federal governments may fine a person for a particular crime.
3. The Excessive Bail Clause restricts judicial discretion in setting bail for the release of persons accused of a criminal activity during the period following their arrest but preceding their trial.
For all of Colonial America the bail law remained the same that is up until 1966 when congress enacted the first major substantive change in federal bail law since 1789. The act of 1966 provides that a non-capital defendant "shall...be ordered released pending trial on his personal recognizance" or on personal bond unless the judicial officer determines that these incentives will not adequately assure his appearance at trial. ETC. The primary problems with the 1966 act were that potentially violent offenders who were released on their own recognizance, otherwise known as an O.R., committed additional criminal acts and then released again on nominal bail.
Now the modern bail law as we know it is guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States but regulated by each individual state. As of this writing, of the fifty states in the Union only four do not have private bail industry. The four states that do not have a private bail industry are Wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky, and Oregon; these four states do still have bail law, but just conduct their bail through their local court system or law enforcement office. The remaining forty six states which have private bail industry regulate themselves through their respective Departments of Insurance’; these states are known as Surety Bail States. For more information on how bail works and why it works as well as for more detailed information on the history of bail please visit All American Bail Bonds of California’s web site at http://www.allamericanbailbonds.net/Learning-Center.php

Written By Customer Service 5/17/09
All American Bail Bonds
“BECAUSE YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO BAIL”

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TEXT FOR BAIL INFO OR INMATE INFO

For Bail Information or Inmate information such as charges, release date, etc please enter Name and Cell number in the following box and a licensed Bail Agent will immediately text back requesting Name of Inmate, D.O.B., County where inmate is being held, and what info you require. If you prefer you can also call Client Services directly @ 866-743-8688. PLEASE NOTE:YOU MUST REPLY YES TO OPT IN ONCE YOU RECEIVE THE AUTO RESPONSE!

ALL AMERICAN BAIL BONDS

ALL AMERICAN BAIL BONDS
Lakewood Ca based Bail Bondsman with offices in Lakewood, Palmdale, Van Nuys, Long Beach, and Orange County